Chevrolet Nova Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,540 Posts
I am not familiar with the concept of Pro Touring. I have toured the entire US and ninety percent of Canada (the parts with roads, not the great white North that requires an Otter float plane to tour). I did it in either a 4x4 Suburban towing a pop up camper or a motor home. I would like to know where I send in the paper work to get paid for my touring as it cost me an arm and a leg to travel, and the term Pro implies you get paid for doing it.

If there is a sanctioning body with a rule book for Pro Touring I am not familiar with it. I have raced in IHRA, NHRA. USAC, and SCCA. (though the idea of just driving around in circles and running into the other bumper cars on the track had me selling my car by the end of my first season). Drag racing and auto cross as well a few real road races did entertain me. Road racing was by far, way too expensive, for my meager capabilities, even when I was still working (all of my competitors were retired millionaires that flew in to race shipping in their cars and crew and the support trucks all by air from Germany or Italy).

Can you describe just what a Pro Tour car does.

Big Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
205 Posts
I gathered together all of my dictionary's today and looked up the words: Sarcastic, Wit, Sardonic and Shrewd. Sadly, no pictures of Dave with the mischievous smile that I can only assume to be permanently fixed upon his countenance ... :thumbsup::beers:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,540 Posts
Ya ignoring my lack of knowledge about pro touting the question I ask remains, just what do you want to do with the car. Once I know that I can recommend what will work best suspension wise to get you to your goal. Also need to know how original you want the car to remain (for example would you be willing to back half the car and run a full fourteen point cage to obtain your goals?).

Big Dave
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,540 Posts
Road Course Racing I am familiar with. We have three tracks in the state for competition, Homestead, Sebring and Daytona. Road racing such as the former TransAm series requires a good foundation to build upon as the suspension requires a stiff frame that will not easily deflect under severe loading. Unfortunately the pony cars didn't make the greatest bodies to work with and where only competitive with each other in the five liter class as European sports cars often sent as much time blinking their lights requesting the right to pass as they did in shifting their five to seven speed ZF gear boxes. Even the Corvette powered by a 427 was eclipsed by much faster Porsche and Ferrari cars in the seven liter class.

I think a seventies vintage TransAm car could be easily recreated if you wanted a fast street car, but I am no longer familiar with the current rules governing Sports Car Club of America, Inc. under their professional rules. I actually discovered that TransAm racing has been reintroduced with the advent of the seven liter and five liter LS-x motors allowing the cars to be competitive with a six speed Borg-Warner T-56 gear box.

http://www.gotransam.com/

Even back in the good old days a Nova being more brick shaped than the other light weight cars never won a race unless half the field was removed due to attrition in terms of mechanical failures and wrecks. You will be traveling at speeds approaching 140 mph were aerodynamics can have a serious affect upon performance.

Big Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
well I could care less about rules as I don't plan to race professional. just something I can take to the local road course in pueblo.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,540 Posts
I would think a truck arm would work best in the back with coil overs in front of the rear axle. Up front aftermarket tubular A-arms to correct the steering geometry issues once again with coil overs instead of coil springs and separate shocks. You are going to want to put the softest (stickiest), widest, lowest profile tires that you can stuff inside the wheel wells up front and back with the rear inner tubs modified to accept the tires.

As far as frame stiffening goes, I would probably start with a Chris Alston or Art Morrison full frame and drop a stripped down and lightened body on top of it. Then I would tie it all together with a lot of MIG wire and tubing to make fourteen point cage.

Since no one makes an off the rack frame for a Nova I would talk to your chassis builder about setting the motor back and down substantially since there are no rules, an mount the motor and tranny solid in the car. Actually there is a full plastic 1968-72 body you can buy that is one third the weight of the steel one. It could be attached to the frame like a flopper or permanently with out riggers off the frame. That would eliminate a lot of lightening of the steel body.

SB2.2 power plant or a turbocharged LS-6 power plant and you could have a spiffy race car.

I built something similar when I mounted a 160 horse Corvair engine amid-ship using a VW microbus trans axle on an old, stretched, Go Cart frame.

Big Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
and if I have a stock body and a modified frame that doesn't interfere with the travel and turning radias. whats the widest I can run without modifying the body?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
CamaroKid, take Dave's sarcasm with a grain of salt, but DO make an effort to understand what he's getting at. You haven't provided much information, just asked a VERY VERY broad question. We don't even know what year the car is, let alone how much power it will have and how that power will be generated.

What does 'Best' mean to you? To me, it means uncompromising design and performance, geometry designed to extract every last thousandth of a second from a lap time. Unfortunately, a suspension like that will be miserable on the street. Also, a massive front tire is not always the best option for a car that sees a lot of street use.

Chassisworks offers several options for your Nova, no matter what the year. Check out the link below; the later Nova stuff will be covered in the Camaro guide, the early Nova/Chevy II has it's own book.

http://www.cachassisworks.com/cac_catalogs_catalogs.html

I hope that's helpful, give me a call if you have any questions.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top