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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

Had time to fabricate and install fuel lines on my on-going '62 project. I use -6AN SS flex from the tank to the frame, 3/8 hard-line under the frame, and then convert back to -6AN SS flex from the frame to the engine bay / EFI carb. I found the biggest hassle with the SS flex hose is assembling the flex line to the connectors with the frayed SS hose ends. This is a cheap and easy fix that worked great for me and saved my finger tips. No more frays to fight with.

A unused shower down spout (or some kind of metal tubing); vise; cutoff wheel; electrical tape. The -6AN SS flex hose is smaller than the tube. Insert the hose thru the metal tube. Very tightly wrap electrical tape around the SS Hose until the hose with tape outside diameter is just slightly smaller than the tubing. Once there, pull the taped hose half way back thru the metal tubing. It should be tight. Use the cutoff wheel to cut the edge straight down at the half way point of the electrical tape.

This saved me alot of hassles and really did not incur any additional costs. Worked great! Hope it helps someone.
 

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There are different ways of doing it, never heard of doing it that way before though, but if it works that's all that matters..:thumbsup:
 

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I use either a super sharp loppers from the wife's garden shed (sharpened in a flat belt bench sander), or if the compressor is running a cut off wheel in a die grinder (be careful where you stand as a die grinder will over speed the cut off wheel by a factor of two or three times depending upon your line pressure), but as with a lawn mower it isn't how sharp the blade is but in how fast it is moving.

My four acre back yard is mown with my John Deer Model M towing a five foot blade 1947 John Deere bush hog that yields as smooth of a cut as does my Sears three bladed yard tractor that has to be constantly have the blades sharpened to get a smooth cut. The John Deere? It has a foot long by six inches wide flat piece of steel three quarters of an inch thick swinging from two inch in diameter steel pin attached to a dished disc three feet in diameter (to jump any stumps I hit). Those plates on the end that form the cutting blade are just whistling around at near super sonic speed is the real difference in how it cuts.

By the way is that stainless steel braided hose PFTE lined (blue plastic), or just regular made in China rubber hose? If it is just rubber expect it to start leaking in a year or two as the rubber is dissolved by todays gasohol.





Big Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #7
As far as the quality of the hose I purchased Russell ProFlex brand. My hope / expectation is that this is a quality item built to last specific for today's EFI applications? If anyone has good, bad or 'other' feedback or experience with this product I would be grateful for the feedback.

From their product page:
PROFLEX HOSE....
For maximum protection and reliability, choose Russell ProFlex performance hose. Constructed with a stainless steel outer braid that resists abrasion and corrosion, ProFlex hose has a reinforced Chlorinated Polyethylene (CPE) synthetic rubber liner with a nylon inner braid that will not collapse under extreme heat, yet is extremely flexible.
 

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Well maybe not, just checked the specs on the hose I used :hurray:

This SAE 30R7 rated Summit® braided nylon hose is designed for use with gas, oil, diesel, and other fluid applications. It uses a higher grade nitrile inner core that is specifically compounded to hold a higher fuel resistance than any other nylon hose product on the market. It can handle heat levels up to 275 degrees F and a maximum working pressure of 350 psi. Summit® braided nylon hose is lightweight and flexible. These features, combined with its ease of assembly, make it the fastest growing choice of hose products for racing and performance enthusiasts.
If/when new hoses are needed I'll use the PTFE lined hose.
 

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1. If you're using an abrasive cutoff wheel to cut hose with...you absolutely must clean the grit out of the hose before you assemble it. Keeping your hose clean is a good idea in any event. Rubber bits are bad enough, but the abrasive from the cutoff wheel is especially harmful.

2. Doesn't really matter what rubber hose you use, there's going to be porosity problems. Some folks route twenty feet of rubber hose from fuel tank to engine, and then can't figure out why the garage always smells like gasoline. The PTFE-liner hose isn't porous. It's a much better choice even though it's sensitive to bend-radius. Bend it too tight, and the PTFE liner will kink. It doesn't fix itself when straightened-out, either.

3. Yes, the PTFE-liner hose uses specific hose ends.

4. Some PTFE hose has a "conductive PTFE" liner, which is apparently a "good thing". I haven't worked with the conductive PTFE hose.

5. Don't forget that hose has a "service life", and after that you throw it out and start fresh.

6. Double-wall seamless steel tubing is lighter, cheaper, and more durable than almost any hose. Use the minimum amount of hose required.

7. "Steel-braided" hose will act like a dull hack-saw on anything it rubs against--including other hoses, metal castings, fasteners, etc. Secure it properly, and route it away from anything it could damage.
 
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