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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I finally got it. A 4” Stinger hood from Glasstek for my ‘74. I have been waiting to get this hood for months. According to Glasstek, they have sold about 9 of these hoods. The interesting thing is that there are no pictures of one anywhere actually on a car, Glasstek doesn't even have one! I personally think it is awesome. A lot of people have just been waiting for the first person to buy one so they can see it before they buy one. AND… HERE IT IS!

But when I got the hood I realized that I didn't really like how the scoop was formed. I knew it wasn't open/functional, but I didn't know the top of the scoop would go smoothly down into the scoop "opening". I thought it would be a little recessed or something. I really didn't like it. I will have to say that I was planning on cutting it out and making a servo operated door on it in the future. I just wasn't planning on doing it so soon. I had even called Glasstek and talked to them about it, to see if they had thought about doing it, no. So in faith, before even bolting it on once, I got out the saw and went at it. A few hours and some fiberglass later it looks pretty darn good. The door will be added somewhere down the road.


For now all I have to do is watch the people look as I drive by. And I guess I need to get some hood pins. One of the stickers on the hood said they really recommend them. I am hesitating because I want to go with a real clean look. Ultimately no trim, no door handles, etc. But maybe I will have to. Aerocatch makes some cool ones.

On another note, Glasstek says I need to paint this hood within a couple of months. I don't have the money or desire to paint the whole car right now, so I am looking for options taking into account a few things.

1. The car is 99% painted with rattlecan primer. Some of it is too thin and is rusting thru.
2. It needs minor bodywork, (small dings, small rust in the rockers, fill trim holes.
3. I have a good gun and a good place to paint myself.
4. I can't fix all the body problems before I paint the hood.
5. I would like the car to be one color.

What would be the best primer or paint to use to temporarily stop the rust and also protect the new hood for a few years?

Thanks for your help.
Doug
 

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Be sure to clean the hood of the wax that is on it now. That wax was put on the mold to allow the fiberglass to separate from the mold, but a lot of the wax gets transferred to the fiberglass. I guess that is why they want you to paint the hood, to remove the wax before it leaches into the fiberglass. It is the only reason I can think of as I doubt you are leaving the car outside (UV rays and plastic don't get along which is why all factory clear coat base coat paint jobs fail after a few years in the full sun).

With the rear open like that you have a lot of air passing through. This could disrupt the air flow into the carb, unless smoothed out. I can see your open element air cleaner which is why I mentioned it.

I painted all of my cars with rattle can primer, alternating between light grey, red oxide , yellow-green zinc chromate, and flat black just to distinguish between my cars since I owned more than one Nova at a time (flat black is a horrible choice for a car color as the car becomes an oven in no time, and the surface is hot enough to burn you if you touch it).

Problem with most primers is they are not water proof. Only a sealer on top of the primer can stop water from getting to your metal and causing rust. The function of primer is to adhere to metal and give the paint something to hold on to. Rustoleum makes a primer sealer combination, but it isn't their high Zinc content primer which I like to protect the metal from rusting while you work on it.

Big Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the info Dave. I understand about the pass-thru airflow issue. The car isn't driven a whole lot right now, and like I said I am planning on putting a door on the front. One thing I hadn't thought of though is with the pass-thru air, if I am going to have the front scoop open "after the front door is installed", should I fab a door for the back to shut it off? Basically so that when one door opens the other closes. I do like the look of the open scoop at times. And I really didn't like the way it looked from the factory.

Also is there a primer I can shoot with a HVLP gun? It will just look smoother. My rattle-can skills are a little lacking.


Thanks,
Doug
 

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The factory scoop in the original 1967 Corvette L-88 427 engine (where the "Stinger" hood scoop first appeared) was always open in the front and close off in the back with two off set hand cut holes feeding two additional offset holes in the panel behind the air box so that you could see straight through to the front, but air could exit if pressure rises.

Big Dave
 

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I second on what Dave said about most Primers not being water proof. You are going to need to use an Etching Primer first, this is for bare metal spots & is a mix of phosphoric acid & Zinc. It is only a surface coating that protects bare metal & doe not stop rust, but prevents its from getting worse. Before you apply any Primers (Etch, Surfacers, Epoxy) you need to thoroughly wipe down the area with a Wax & Grease remover, as even finger prints will leave a residue & can cause issues down the road. Next course of action would be to use a high build primer surfacer, which can fill in minor imperfections & chips, but you will have to use a sealer over that if you want to store outside for a long period of time. At my shop we use Sherwin Williams Spectra Prime 2k. It is a great product, and down the line it really holds up well. (http://www.sherwin-automotive.com/c...um-undercoats/swaf-prd-undercoats-p30-df.html)
Another option is use of an Epoxy Primer, I can not suggest one for that as we are not a restoration shop, just a production shop that is mostly BMW, Audi, Porsche & Mercedes. All of these you can use an HVLP gun for smoother & more constant coverage, but it does not come cheap. There is no mention of what type of HVLP gun you want to use, but if it is a Harbor Freight special, I suggest really cleaning up the gun, as the Primers are temperamental to foreign chemicals. Last year at the shop we spray with 3 different guns, one being a brand new Harbor Freight $20 HVLP. Took the entire gun apart & sent it threw the gun washer a few times. Once we sprayed the primer, it "Fish Eyed" an insane amount. Had to start all over by sanding the product down to nothing. Took the gun apart & soaked it in thinner for a few days & that seemed to work well. Just remember, preparation is key. Take your time & you will have less headaches later on.
 

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I second on what Dave said about most Primers not being water proof. You are going to need to use an Etching Primer first, this is for bare metal spots & is a mix of phosphoric acid & Zinc. It is only a surface coating that protects bare metal & doe not stop rust, but prevents its from getting worse. Before you apply any Primers (Etch, Surfacers, Epoxy) you need to thoroughly wipe down the area with a Wax & Grease remover, as even finger prints will leave a residue & can cause issues down the road. Next course of action would be to use a high build primer surfacer, which can fill in minor imperfections & chips, but you will have to use a sealer over that if you want to store outside for a long period of time. At my shop we use Sherwin Williams Spectra Prime 2k. It is a great product, and down the line it really holds up well. (http://www.sherwin-automotive.com/c...um-undercoats/swaf-prd-undercoats-p30-df.html)
Another option is use of an Epoxy Primer, I can not suggest one for that as we are not a restoration shop, just a production shop that is mostly BMW, Audi, Porsche & Mercedes. All of these you can use an HVLP gun for smoother & more constant coverage, but it does not come cheap. There is no mention of what type of HVLP gun you want to use, but if it is a Harbor Freight special, I suggest really cleaning up the gun, as the Primers are temperamental to foreign chemicals. Last year at the shop we spray with 3 different guns, one being a brand new Harbor Freight $20 HVLP. Took the entire gun apart & sent it threw the gun washer a few times. Once we sprayed the primer, it "Fish Eyed" an insane amount. Had to start all over by sanding the product down to nothing. Took the gun apart & soaked it in thinner for a few days & that seemed to work well. Just remember, preparation is key. Take your time & you will have less headaches later on.
Just out of curiosity can I still use my forty year old Binks spray paint gun that I used to use to spray primer over unpreped metal I had been welding on to slow down rust. All I had to do back then was pour paint in the bottom of the can and thin it out as needed to get it to spray. Simple enough that even I could make it work. I keep reading about these new HVAC paint guns and epoxy (I used to spray enamel paint or lacquer paint back then). Can I still get paint without having to go the Home Depot for some water soluble house paint and put it on with my Black and decker electric paint gun?

Big Dave
 

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Just out of curiosity can I still use my forty year old Binks spray paint gun that I used to use to spray primer over unpreped metal I had been welding on to slow down rust. All I had to do back then was pour paint in the bottom of the can and thin it out as needed to get it to spray. Simple enough that even I could make it work. I keep reading about these new HVAC paint guns and epoxy (I used to spray enamel paint or lacquer paint back then). Can I still get paint without having to go the Home Depot for some water soluble house paint and put it on with my Black and decker electric paint gun?

Big Dave
I am sure you could use it, but I have never attempted with something with so much, how do I say, history behind it l:) Most of those guns at this point are illegal to even use, but then again when using your own garage, anything is on the table. I assume the insane amount of over spray will make one a bit light headed. I am still new to the auto body industry, with only 2 years in, but I have picked up on a good amount from the older guys. They know my passion for old cars, so I pick brains as much as possible.
 

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I am sure you could use it, but I have never attempted with something with so much, how do I say, history behind it l:) Most of those guns at this point are illegal to even use, but then again when using your own garage, anything is on the table. I assume the insane amount of over spray will make one a bit light headed. I am still new to the auto body industry, with only 2 years in, but I have picked up on a good amount from the older guys. They know my passion for old cars, so I pick brains as much as possible.
Well that would explain why I can remember anything.

With my welding when I first started out it was the bigger the gob the better the job, and if I burned through that proven I was really getting penetration with my welds. I got better with practice and moved from a stick to a MIG then a TIG machine but with my lack of coordination (can hardly walk any more due to neuropathy) I don't know if I can control the power pedal any more (or shoot a hand gun for that matter).

My painting never got any better, I just had longer runs, and more fish eyes than the San Diego aquarium. I knew when I was licked, so I hung up my Binks (I actually had three but a friend borrowed my best gun and forgot to clean it: or return it for a few weeks).

Big Dave
 
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