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I have a 1970 chevy nova with a 350 and i was wondering what kind of cam i should choose. I dont want it to be very radical but i want it to sound rough and perform well.

Specs Are:
350
TH-350 Shift Kit #2
8:5-9:1 Compression
Performer Air Gap
Performer 600 cfm carb
MSD Ignition
3.73 Gears

Thank you
 

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What heads are you running?

With that combo, there's a good Crane cam that I've used that works well for a daily driver or street/strip toy that's not too on the edge, about .480 lift and 222 duration I believe (have to find the cam card).

Derek
 

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I have a 1970 chevy nova with a 350 ... I dont want it to be very radical but i want it to sound rough and perform well.

Thank you
You must realize that the sounding rough means it doesn't perform well. The two are mutually exclusive. The lope you hear in a hot rod is the duration and short LSA angle which used to be chosen to obtain high RPM operation at the expense of being able to drive on the street. In other words in order to get great performance in the higher RPM were the engine makes peak horse power the builder of the engine sacrificed on the alter of performance any streetability of the engine.

If you were to attempt to drive around town with a radical cam it would buck and die at every opportunity unless you slip the clutch and rev it up to get the car to move because it is making "Yard Tractor" levels of horse power were you need it most to get the car rolling. If you want Brigs & Stratton power on the street go to the bottom of the cam chart and you will get it every time.

Additionally I said slip the clutch. If you have an automatic transmission you must increase the stall with a cam or it will do just that, stall when you put it in gear; that is why it is called stall. An automatic transmission with a high stall speed is slipping all the time. You have to buy an auxiliary transmission cooler to shed the extra heat that your few remaining horse power are wasted due to fluid shear heating the transmission oil.

If you want to actually drive on the street do not go over 220° duration, or go smaller than 110° LSA. Your other option is to record the sound of a radical cam and play it on your car's stereo. Most modern stereos are loud enough to drown out the sound of a radical car, sitting at idle, uncapped. That way you can have the performance you want and the sound.

I have in my 582 BBC a CompCams solid roller grind number 296CR-8 part number 11-715-9 with 262°/270° duration @ 0.050" lift, and 0.714"/.714" lift at the valve on a 108° LSA: Valve Timing At 0.02" lift, Intake Opens @ 40° Closes @ 76°; Exhaust Opens @ 80° Closes @ 44°. I have to replace the bronze gear drive on my billet MSD distributor every 1200 miles. I can not run the engine for more than 25 hours without adjusting valves and checking spring pressures. I do have an automatic transmission but it has a 3400 RPM stall and I run 4.56:1 rear gears. It does indeed sound radical but it is not exactly what I would recommend as a daily driver (in fact I will not let my wife even drive it, :sad: or even crank it up :mad: ).

I chose a nasty cam and built a huge motor to compensate (move the car on the street). Life is a compromise, I refuse to compromise; how about you? :thumbsup:

Big Dave
 
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