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I have a 69 Nova that I'm doing a complete restoration on and I am putting the front frame back together. I also switched out the old drum brakes in the front for some disc brakes. I have purchased a set of 18x9 Foose Legend rims that look amazing setting up beside the car. When I mounted the front tire on the disc brakes I noticed that the rim hits the top control car when I turn the wheels with the tie rod bar. What should I do to fix this problem? I tried a 5/16" spacer but that doesn't seem to help. Should I mount an adapter to the disc nub to push the rim out a little further? I don't want the tires to stick out deyond the fenders either. If I do this will it cause problems later since I will have over 400 horses under the hood. What do you sugguest?
 

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Welcome to the Team Wolf!

Well since you are married to the wheels and tires you either have to find a car they will fit or modify your car to accept a wheel and tire that will not fit your car.

If you move the wheels out with spacers you are going to cause steering issues as well as accelerate the wear on your front wheel bearings since you are increasing the lever arm that applies a force that isn't there with the stock wheels. Stock wheels have the center of the wheel centered on the spindle so that torque from a wheel offset is neutral (neutral back spacing, or half of the wheels width in back spacing depending upon who you want to look at it.

If you have neutral back spaced wheels (4-1/2 inch back spacing) you have an inch and half more back spacing than the factory engineers figured on when they designed the car.

You will have to modify your cars steering and frame to accept those wheels and tires. If you watch Ian on Extreme 4x4 every week on PowerBlockTV every week you will see him modifying and custom building suspension components to clear bigger wheels and tires (in his case they are much bigger so even though you will have to modify all of your suspension parts, you just don't have to go to the extremes that Ian does). He notches the frame and boxes it back in for clearance and uses custom bent aluminum bars that are machined to replace stock suspension tie rod ends and center links as well as building custom tubular components and welding on brackets to accept bigger tires.

Or you could find out what fits your car with a $73 dollar tire/wheel fitment tool so that you will know the biggest tire and wheel combination with back spacing that will fit under the fender and be able turn without hitting anything.

Believe it or not a lot of guys would rather modify heir car to get the tire and wheel they want than try and live with what the factory allows them. I say have at it, just be safe in doing what you want to do. I say that because I am a retired engineer and have a pretty good idea of how a front end on a car works. You don't have to spend five years of your life in engineering college (besides they only teach math science and basic theory not how to modify a car) but reading this book will help you know what you are up against:

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/listi...LA-_-Book_25To44-_-Q000000633-_-2687052234416

Herb Adams the engineer that wrote this book worked for GM in the Pontiac division and modified the Firebirds suspension so that it handled better than the Camaro in competition using just stock parts.

Big Dave
 
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