Do you use grease in your radiator hoses? [Archive] - Nova Tech

: Do you use grease in your radiator hoses?


ToocoolSS
Nov 19th, 05, 10:33 PM
Does anyone use grease on the inside of the radiator hoses where they slide on the radiator or water pump? Several old timers tell me to always do this so you can get the hoses off next time without damaging the radiator or the hoses. Makes sense I guess.
Ron

72-SS-L48
Nov 20th, 05, 10:55 PM
Personally, I have never heard of using grease inside a radiator house. To be honest I use a little bit of gasket sealer to prevent leaks, and make sure that the hose stays on even though it has a clamp on it.

Motorhead62
Nov 21st, 05, 09:54 PM
I use a very light film of oil to ease in installing the hoses. This is really improtant when doing heater hoses at the firewall.:beers:

BillK
Nov 22nd, 05, 08:50 PM
Cool,
Actually, any petroleum product will deteriorate rubber hoses and should not be used.

Al
Nov 22nd, 05, 10:42 PM
Would you suggest anything at all Bill?
I've used a variety over the years with no ill effects (but that doesn't mean it was right) such as white lithium, a dab of vaseline and quite often nothing at all.
Sure does make a difference a year later if they have to be removed though.

BillK
Nov 23rd, 05, 08:23 PM
Al,
I have never used anything on them. I do know a lot of guys that give them a shot of WD40 or something similar. Anyway...... your not supposed to be taking them back off :)

Rusty Bucket
Nov 25th, 05, 08:55 AM
Had a flashback of lying on my back in a puddle of rusty warm antifreeze with the back of my head all wet, glob of crud in my right eye, in a dark parking lot.....trying to stretch on a bottom radiator hose made in Pakistan or SOME place from a discount auto parts chain store. Like trying to strecth a gnat's a$$ over a Coke bottle, as my Dad usta say. I mighta used a glob of grease off of a lower ball joint grease fitting----sorry Bill. I've managed to crack the solder seam on the radiator outlet twisting 'em around a couple of times. Well, once I wrung one off trying to save a good looking used hose instead of slicing it like I should've.

montrosepatriot
Dec 1st, 05, 03:18 AM
I have used Super Taylor Lube (lube for commercial freezers) for several years on radiator and heater hose fittings. The product can only be obtained from a commercial refrigerator facility.

69Nova355
Dec 2nd, 05, 02:36 AM
I've not heard of using grease on a radiator hose to make it easier to get off but it does make sense. I myself usually break them loose with a pair of pliers. If that doesn't work I just cut the hose off at the flange and then take a utility knife and cut the remaining piece of hose off.

Is petroleum really that bad on radiator hoses though?

Musclecarmadness
Dec 2nd, 05, 03:44 AM
Only in my opinion, i have never used anything on the I.D. of any hoses to install..i have sprayed only water on the inside to help install it...as for as removing any of the hoses..i have just cut a slit on one side of the hose to remove it...it would worry me, if i used any lube...that it might leak water or loosen up..later..but then again ...it always takes me twice as long to do any of my "own" work on any of my engines...i have to have (1) My radio on in the garage(2) a beer in the freezer(not to forget to remove and replace)(3) not to be bothered by any phone calls..
:beers:

TERRY
Dec 24th, 05, 04:33 PM
i dont use anything on them either? when putting them on i have used water or wd40 in the past but it had no effect at all when trying to remove them.
to remove them i just grab ahold close to the end and twist on them. if they dont come loose i swear at them and get the razor knife!!! that always works!
i think it's the swearing that get's them scared and the knife just makes me feel better? or something like that!

Gloryhound
Dec 25th, 05, 12:07 PM
I think alot of that is going to depend on the cars use. If I have a show car that I like to keep the hoses lookin pretty then I say use something to aid in removal and replacement on a more regular basis. If I'm doing a daily driver keep it how it was meant, a dry connection. As far as drag racing, a reliability study would need to be done to see if putting it in there is going to cause problems before one without.

clill
Dec 27th, 05, 05:20 PM
Silicone spray makes the hoses almost jump on....

Lowke
Jan 16th, 06, 12:24 PM
I have used a film of grease before.
I use dish soap too. The dish soap makes it tough to remove. That's what hose hooks are for. ;)

L48M20
Feb 12th, 06, 12:01 PM
Shot of WD-40 makes it so much easier to install and a carefully placed screwdriver to pop the seal to remove.

:)

Livn-lg
Feb 26th, 06, 11:33 PM
I do not put nothing on the hoses nor had I heard of such a thing. I have however heard the myth of adding a couple tablespoons of vegetable oil to the water to coat passages and reduce the chance of plugging the block over time. Anyone else heard that one??

big gear head
Mar 9th, 06, 12:00 AM
I tried grease on the hoses for a while. I had 2 of them blow off, so I quit doing that.

RATCHETMASTER
Mar 9th, 06, 06:06 PM
Had a flashback of lying on my back in a puddle of rusty warm antifreeze with the back of my head all wet, glob of crud in my right eye, in a dark parking lot.....trying to stretch on a bottom radiator hose made in Pakistan or SOME place from a discount auto parts chain store. Like trying to strecth a gnat's a$$ over a Coke bottle, as my Dad usta say. I mighta used a glob of grease off of a lower ball joint grease fitting----sorry Bill. I've managed to crack the solder seam on the radiator outlet twisting 'em around a couple of times. Well, once I wrung one off trying to save a good looking used hose instead of slicing it like I should've.
LOL!!!! I have had similar experiences . . . hahaha

I have always used a little lube to make the installation and removal of radiator hoses on my cars a little easier. 16 lbs of pressure shouldn't blow them off as long as you don't leave a lot on the hose. Wipe it off first leaving only a light coat inside. ;)

Bart
Apr 12th, 06, 08:43 PM
Don't use any grease or oil to lube the insde of your hoses. This will only cause the hose to fail prematurely. If you have to lube it use WD-40, water or good old spit.

If you are concerned about removing the hose then I recommend buying a hose pick tool. This tool will allow you to loosen the hose up from the fitting with out damaging the hose. It is also bent in a fashion that makes it easy to get under the hose when working in areas where the clearances are tight. You can get these from Snap-On, Mac or Matco tools.

jr
May 2nd, 06, 08:52 AM
I got a chrome thube from the swap meet and attached it with hose at the ends. I put oil on the chrome tube part-real tight fit- till the engine got to temp and it blew off-just missed me . I was working under the hood.
Not a good idea.

new2novas
May 3rd, 06, 06:49 PM
i usually give them a small shot of zep45, a lubricant similar to wd40 and the like

72GreenRally
May 3rd, 06, 09:12 PM
The only thing I have ever used in hoses is silicone spray. You have to be quick because it goes away fast!!! Once the clamp has been tightened up, the hose is gonna stay put. It is nearly as difficult to remove as it would be if the hose is installed dry.

Randy (don't like the idea of slippery hoses):o

new2novas
May 3rd, 06, 10:52 PM
if i have problems getting them off (most spray lubricants will dissipate eventually, i wouldn't use anything that would stay more than a few minutes)...i use a hook type pick tool and pull a section of the hose away, then spray some lube in there and run the tool all the way around the inside of the hose, works every time

lynnj
May 5th, 06, 07:47 PM
Silicone spray makes the hoses almost jump on....

Yep! That's what I use.

trip-l-jax
May 10th, 06, 11:56 PM
I use the same type chemical that goes through the hoses... antifreeze